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Bristol Bulldog

 

Bristol Bulldog

The Bristol Bulldog II's primary role is / was that of Fighter and is / was produced by The Bristol Company - UK. The official Service Year for the first production model of the Bristol Bulldog II is / was 1927. The system has / had accommodations for 1 crew member / passengers. The Bristol Bulldog II features / featured a top speed of 174 mph (280 km/h) and could reach a maximum altitude of 27,000 ft (8,230 m). Full statistics and measurements are presented below.

The Bristol Bulldog series of biplane aircraft were developed in the interwar years leading up to World War Two, to which then they were replaced by Gloster Gauntlets. The Bulldog ushered in several technological revolutions that included a dedicated pilot oxygen supply and a shock absorbing tailskid element. Initially fulfilling a British Air Ministry requirement for a fighter capable of engaging the latest bomber designs worldwide, the Bulldog was designed to specification through the first Bulldog Mark I. Utilizing the traditional biplane construction and an all-metal with fabric covering exterior, the Bulldog was armed with twin synchronized Vickers machine guns. The Mark II version in the Bulldog series went into operational status and would make up 3/4 of the entire British air defense forces. Bulldogs would serve with distinction through 1937 and ultimately phased from frontline service but not until finding homes globally as well.

Ylikersantti Toivo Antero Uuttu - The Finnish Air Force signed an agreement on 24 March 1934 for the purchase of seventeen Bristol Bulldog Mk.IVA fighters. The aircraft were to be used as front-line fighters and were delivered to the country in February 1935. The serial numbers were 7810 to 7826 and they were coded from BU-59 to BU-75. After the outbreak of the Winter War, the Swedish State donated two Bulldog Mk.IIAs, which were received on 15 December 1939, and coded BU-214 and BU-216. The Swedish Air Force called the Bulldog for J7 (J=jaktflygplan which means fighter) and used twelve between 1931 and 1940. On 7 November 1938 the Finnish Bulldogs were transferred to LLv 26 of Lentorykmentti 2 (2nd Flying Regiment) and this were they were in service at the time of the outbreak of the Winter War on 30 November 1939. The Squadron was at the time under the command of kapteeni (Captain) Erkki Heinil and based at Heinjoki (Heinil was to leave command to majuri Raoul Harju-Jeanty during December). The 2nd and 3rd Flights (these Flights were flying Fokker D.XXIs) of the squadron were subordinate to LLv 24. The remaining of the squadron was called Osasto (Detachment) Heinil and tasked with interception and protection duties in the rear lines of the Karelian Isthmus with ten remaining Bulldogs. The first contact between Soviet aircraft and Finnish fighters happened at 11:45-11:55 on 1 December 1939 when six Polikarpov I-16s from 7 IAP jumped a Bulldog pair of LLv 26. While the other Bulldog got separated, BU-64 piloted by ylikersantti (Flight Sergeant) Toivo Uuttu in BU-64 was left alone to fight the Russians. After scoring hits on one I-16 he himself was also shot down and he crashed at Muolaanjrvi getting injured in the process. ylikersantti (Flight Sergeant) Uuttus victim also crashed and became the first aerial victory ever over Finland. On 6 December, the detachment moved to Mensuvaara and three days later on to

 

Variants:

  • Bulldog Mk ISingle-seat day and night fighter prototype. 2 built by Bristol Aeroplane Co.
  • Bulldog Mk IISingle-seat day and night fighter version. Powered by a 328-kW (440-hp) Bristol Jupiter VII radial piston engine. 92 built by Bristol Aeroplane.
  • Bulldog Mk IIASingle-seat day and night fighter version. Powered by a 365-kW (490-hp) Bristol Jupiter VIIF radial piston engine. 268 built by Bristol.
  • Bulldog Mk IIIAInterim aircraft. Only two aircraft were built by Bristol.
  • Bulldog Mk IVASingle-seat day and night fighter version. Powered by a 477-kW (640-hp) Bristol Mercury radial piston engine. 18 built by Bristol.
  • Bulldog TMTwo-seat training version. 59 built by Bristol.
  • "J.S.S.F.". 2 built by Nakajima Aircraft Works, Japan

Bristol Bulldog

The Bristol Bulldog was the RAF fighter of the early 1930s. Also used by the Royal Australian Air Force in WW2 (8). Air show crowds thrilled to its smoke-trail aerobatics at Hendon in the late twenties; to the Royal Air Force it was the standard fighter, equipping ten of its thirteen home defence Squadrons.
In 1964, this aircraft crashed at the Farnborough Air Show and the aviation world thought the aircraft was beyond recovery. The RAF Museum, however, recovered the wreckage and in 1994 finally was able to place the contract to rebuild this aviation classic. After over five years painstaking work you can now see the result of one of the most complete restoration programmes yet attempted by the RAF Museum.

Bristol Bulldog

The Bulldog never saw combat service with the RAF, though during the Abyssinia Crisis of 1935-36, Bristol Bulldogs were sent to the Sudan to reinforce Middle East Command. Douglas Bader, better known for his Second World War actions, lost both of his legs when his Bristol Bulldog crashed while he was performing unauthorised flying acrobatics. A number of Bulldogs, ex-Latvian aircraft, saw service during the Spanish Civil War, as part of the forces fighting the Nationalists. The Bulldogs also saw combat as part of the Finnish Air Force during the Winter War against the Soviet Union, which began in 1939. The Bulldogs fought well against their Soviet opponent, gaining a number of kills, the types being the Polikarpov I-16 and Tupolev SB-2, both of which were quite superior in terms of technology compared to the Bulldog. The Bulldog continued in service during the subsequent Continuation War, again, against the Soviet Union.