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Bulldog Types

Bulldog Breed Types

Bulldog

General Bulldog Information by Wikipedia

The Bulldog, colloquially known as the English Bulldog or British Bulldog, is a medium-size breed of dog that originated in England.

The bulldog is a stocky breed, with a compact body and short, sturdy limbs. Its shape results in a peculiarly unique gait. Bulldogs are known for their short muzzles and the saggy skin on their faces, creating the apparent "frown" that has become a trademark of the breed. Bulldogs come in a variety of colours and ideally have a smooth, short coat. The only disqualifier for the breed in the show ring is a liver colored nose, however a black-coated Bulldog is also not preferred. In the US, the size of a typical mature male is about 50 pounds; that for mature females is about 40 pounds. In the United Kingdom, the breed standard is 55 pounds for a male and 50 pounds for a female.

The temperament of the Bulldog is generally docile, friendly and gregarious but are known to be fiercely loyal. Breeders have worked to breed aggression out of the breed, and as such the dog is known to be of generally good temperament. Bulldogs can be so attached to home and family that they will not venture out of the yard without a human companion. Due to their friendly nature bulldogs are known for getting along well with children, other breeds of dog and any house-broken pet in general. A bulldog is suitable for houses as well as apartments due to their size and comparative lack of energy, but puppies may be destructive until they reach maturity.

The bulldog is prone to some health issues but no more so than most other pure breed dogs. Breathing issues can be prevalent in the breed due to the shape of the lower jaw and the shortness of muzzle - bulldogs are known to snore. In the United Kingdom, some dogs can be prone to interstitial cysts, that is cysts which form between the toes. These cause the dog some discomfort, though they are treatable either by vet or an experienced owner. Other problems can include cherry eye, certain allergies and amongst older bulldogs, hip issues.

Because of the large heads in proportion to body size, puppies are frequently delivered by Caesarean section as they can get stuck in the birth canal during natural birth, however it is not uncommon for a bulldog bitch to whelp naturally and successfully.

Bulldogs require daily cleaning of their face folds to avoid unwanted infections caused by moisture accumulation. Daily teeth brushing with a regular human soft toothbrush using a vet approved toothpaste is also recommended.

Like all dogs, Bulldogs require daily exercise. If not properly exercised the bulldog could gain weight, which could cause health problems relating to the lungs and heart. Bulldogs are extremely sensitive to heat and cold and great care should be given to the dog during overly warm periods. During these times, ensure the dog has plenty of shade, water and should be ideally kept out of standing heat.

As the breed has developed, the tail in some dogs can be tight to the body and can cause infection if not treated or cleaned underneath regularly.

The term "bulldog" was first used around 1568 and might have been applied to various ancestors of modern bulldog breeds.

In the 1600s, bulldogs were used for bullbaiting (as well as bearbaiting), a wagering sport popular in the 17th century in which trained bulldogs leapt at a bull lashed to a post, latched onto its snout and attempted to suffocate it.

The oldest single breed specialty club is The Bulldog Club (England), which was formed in 1875. Members of this club met frequently at the Blue Post pub on Oxford Street in London. There they wrote the first standard of perfection for the breed. In 1891 the two top bulldogs, Orry and Dockleaf, competed in a contest to see which dog could walk the farthest. King Orry was reminiscent of the original bulldogs ? lighter boned and very athletic. Dockleaf was smaller and heavier set ? more like modern bulldogs. Dockleaf was declared the winner that year. Although some argued that the older version of the bulldog was more fit to perform, the modern version?s looks won over the fans of the breed because they proved they were equally as fit and athletic in the walking competition.

Recently, many people have tried to recreate a breed more akin to the original bullbaiter. Examples of the trend are the Olde Englishe Bulldogge, Renascence Bulldog, Victorian, Continental and Dorset Old Tyme Bulldog. The AKC does not recognize any of these newly "recreated" breeds of dogs.

Catahoula Bulldog

The Catahoula Bulldog had been around for over 100 years, registered through the Animal Research Foundation (ARF), the oldest all-breed registry, the Catahoula Bulldog is a cross of two versatile workingbreeds, the Catahoula Leopard dog and the American Bulldog. The name Catahoula comes from an Indian word meaning "clear water", has a wide range of coloring from merle to white with eyes being brown, green, ice blue, gold.They are very good for children. The Catahoula Bulldog tends to use their ears in a very expressive manner. They are used as a watch or guard dog, and may be used in hunting.They are dogs that go through training well.

Catahoula Bulldog

FOR THOSE WHO SEE AND FALL IN LOVE WITH A CATAHOULA BULLDOG: These same individuals often will want to know, "What constitutes a Catahoula Bulldog? In short, a Catahoula Bulldog is a cross of two high quality breeds ? one being an ARF Registered Catahoula. In 1968, ARF welcomed Mr. Bart Perry, of Midlothian, Texas, as the first ARF Certified Breeder of CATAHOULA BULLDOGS. Six years prior, Bart had been active in the raising of American Bulldogs, and had decided to expand into the Catahoula line.The Catahoula Bulldog was bred for two reasons. First, ranchers and hog-hunters have used Catahoulas for many ears to herd cattle and hunt hogs, but, to catch hogs, they had to carry a catch-dog with them. It seemed that most Catahoulas were neither big enough, nor tough enough, to catch. The American Bulldog has an impeccable reputation as a catch-dog. Therefore, when the American Bulldog is crossed with a Catahoula, you get a bigger, tougher dog which will work cattle and also catch hogs when needed. The second reason is that the Catahoula Bulldog is an excellent bear dog because it has the size and aggressiveness of the American Bulldog, and the intelligence and hunting ability of the Catahoula.Did you ever hear that proverbial expression, Always get acquainted with your dog? Spend the first week of the dog?s education by just feeding, petting, and walking with him. You need to get acquainted with him as much as he needs to get acquainted with you. Most animals are part of a "pack order" psychological system. In the wolf family, order is enforced by the pack leader, and he usually is the strongest and fiercest male who has the ability to subdue any rival in battle, whether a wild dog pack, wild hogs, deer herds, etc. This strong instinct to be a leader, and, also, an equally strong instinct for submissive behavior is what a trainer exploits, to the best of his ability, in his dog. Keep in mind, even well-trained dogs can revert to their wild nature, and this is why it is an unwritten law of the range never to let your dog roam. If you do, never complain if he gets shot.The Catahoula Bulldog is a rugged canine, full of life and independence. He will sacrifice all for his ability to work the ranging lands where herds and wild animals roam. His instincts are razor sharp, and his intelligence makes him a top working dog, and one of the best personal protection dogs one could want. The "Catahoula Bulldog" is recognized as a 50-50 first generation cross between the Catahoula and the American Bulldog, and up to a 75-25 cross in succeeding generations. It is desirable to keep the cross within the 75-25 limit in order not to lose the basic characteristics of these two fine breeds.

The Argentine Dogo (also known as the Dogo Argentino or Argentinian Mastiff) is a large, white, game-bred, muscular dog that was developed in Argentina for big game hunting.

In the 1920s in Argentina, Antonio Nores Martinez started breeding a dog intended to not only be a pet and family guardian, but also a hunting dog capable of taking on big game such as wild boar and cougars.

Martinez picked the Cordoba Fighting Dog to be the base for the breed. This breed is extinct today but was described as a large and ferocious dog that was both a great hunter and fighter. He crossed it with Great Dane, Boxer, Spanish Mastiff, Old English Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Great Pyrenees, Pointer, Irish Wolfhound and Dogue de Bordeaux. Martinez kept improving the resulting breed via selective breeding to introduce the desired traits. The first standard for the Dogo Argentino was written in 1928.

Appearance (UKC) -

The Dogo Argentino is a large, white, short-coated dog with a smooth, muscular body, displaying both power and athletic ability. The minimum height for the male is 62 cm (24.3 inches) at the withers, for the female 60 cm (23.5 inches). Maximum height is 68.5 cm (27 inches). The length of body is just slightly longer than tall, but bitches may be somewhat longer in body than dogs. The length of the front leg (measured from point of elbow to the ground) is approximately equal to one-half of the dog's height at the withers. The head is powerful with a broad, slightly domed skull and a powerful muzzle that is slightly higher at the nose than the stop, when viewed in profile. Ears may be cropped, or hang naturally, close to the skull. The relatively short tail is set low, thick at the base and tapers to a point. The Dogo Argentino should be evaluated as a hunting dog, and exaggerations or faults should be penalized in proportion to how much they interfere with the dog's ability to work.

White English Bulldog

Razze Bulldog

Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog

History

Is a very rare breed, similar to the American Bulldog there are about 120 Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs worldwide, developed in the Alapaha River region of southern Georgia by the Lane family of Rebecca, to preserve the "plantation dog" from extinction. The Lane's breeding program started in the late 1800s. The Alapaha would be a descendent of the original Bulldogs that came to the U.S.A. in the 1700s. The American Research Foundation recognize the breed from 1986 in the working dog category. From 1986 to 2001, ARF has registered under 700 Alapahas.This bulldog-type dog breed descends by Otto the Buck Lane's dog.I n 1943 Buck Lane was killed by a train and his granddaughter, Lana Lou Lane, continued the breeding program until her death on July 20th 2001. Later, Mrs. Vivian Lane sold her daughter's kennel.

Appearance

Displaying an unexaggerated and well-developedl bulldog type. Descriptions of its size vary greatly, calling for males anywhere from 65 to 90 pounds (32 to 45 kg) standing 19 to 26 inches (48 to 73.5 cm) at the withers, females smaller at 60 to 70 pounds (22.5 to 41 cm). Ears and tail are natural, with no cropping or docking. Colors of the Alapaha are varied, typically white or different shades of black, grey, red, fawn, brindle, brown, buckskin, or mahogany, always with white markings; some dogs are piebald spotted.

Temperament

The ABBB is described as trainable, dutiful, and responsible, with impressive capabilities as a guardian of family and property, but aggressive only in defense of these. Could be used as a guard-dog, watch-dog or pet-dog.

 

American Bulldog

Coal miners in the Staffordshire region crossed English Bulldogs with scrappy terriers and continued the gladitorial tradition in clandestine matches that are still going on today. From these Bulldog Terrier crosses we get the American Bulldog, the American Pit Bull Terrier, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier and the Bull Terrier.

There are two distinct strains of American Bulldogs, Classic (Johnson, Bully) and Standard (Scott, Performance) which is often mistaken for its second cousin, the American Pit Bull Terrier because of its appearance, and for its much smaller European relatives because of its name. The American Bulldog is different from any of these. The American Bulldog is massive in comparison to the French Bulldog or English Bulldog as it still resembles the Old English Bulldog and was never down bred to be a lap dog.

The Standard American Bulldog does resemble the pit bull-type breeds on many points, such as being muscular dogs that can be all white or white with patches. However, the pit bull's head is in the shape of a wedge coming to a more rounded point at the muzzle, whereas an American Bulldog's is box-shaped. The American Bulldog's ears are also typically uncropped, and its head is heavier and a little bulkier. Another major difference is size, with the American Bulldog generally being much larger than a purebred American Pitbull Terrier (which according to the UKC standard should only weigh 30 - 60 pounds).

The two types differ temperamentally as well as physically. The Johnson dogs are descendants of the plantation Bulldogs that were kept as yard dogs in the old south. They are typically more territorial, more man aggressive, in short more of a guardian. The athletic Scott strain descended from hog and cattle catch dogs. They were and still are used to catch wild hogs and cattle that have strayed into brush so thick that a man on horse back would find it impenetrable. This type of work requires extreme physical prowess. For this reason the smaller strain is called Performance